Determining an ideal Sprint Length

All the articles I find tend toward it being better to have shorter sprints. The arguments are for shorter sprints sprints in most cases. Here are few articles on the subject.

 

https://agilepainrelief.com/notesfromatooluser/2013/07/choosing-sprint-length-shorter-trumps-longer.html#.VrSLbFMrLUo

https://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/blog/who-picks-the-sprint-length-on-a-scrum-team

http://www.agilehelpline.com/2011/03/sprint-length.html

 

Related Article:
http://www.agilehelpline.com/2011/03/definition-of-done.html
Important excerpts from above article:

  • If you never heard about DoD then please learn more about it. You may read articles in the reference section and work with your team to define DONE. A new team (less mature) might have a simple definition of DONE and may be tempted to create lots of tasks to reflect process.  A more mature team will have a stronger definition of DONE and will be less tempted to create process-tasks and will focus more on software deliverables.
  • DoD is not static. It changes over time. Organizational support and the team’s ability to remove impediments may enable the inclusion of additional activities into the DoD for features or sprints. 
  • DoD is an audit checklist. It can be used to validate whether all major tasks are accounted for. Also, after a feature or sprint is done, DoD is used as a checklist to verify whether all necessary value-added activities were completed.
  • A definition of DONE is only good if it is living and is part of a team’s DNA.  If the team does not know its DONE by heart then the practice is no good.  It would be smart to put a team’s “done” in front of it at the beginning and end of each iteration – if only for a moment to remind them & to create an opportunity to upgrade it.   Team members should be encouraged to tape the definition to their monitor.
  • ScrumMasters may do well to put it in front of the team at Scrum regularly until it sinks in. A Scrum Master should be on the lookout for opportunities to improve a team’s DONE.  Process problems often indicate a need for an upgrade.

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